RSS
 

Use name tags to label just about anything

22 Feb

Name tag labelsLong ago, I bought some name tags for a Halloween costume. Of course, I only needed one, so I had dozens of them lying around, begging for a new use. Since then, I have used name tags to label everything imaginable around the house. When I ran out, I actually bought more name tags rather than some other kind of label because I liked them so much. You might have already noticed them on the bottles of vanilla extract I made for the holidays.

Labels make any long-term storage project more effective. My brewing equipment lives in specific boxes, and I store the ingredients inside in airtight containers. Without labels, I would have a lot more trouble taking inventory and selecting ingredients.

The more you use them, the more they help you, too. Using a standard style of label such as a name tag makes it easy for the eye to identify the labels. Using labels consistently means no more forgotten, anonymous leftovers in the fridge or freezer.

To state the obvious: you don’t have to use name tags. Any adhesive label will do, making folders, bins, boxes, and other storage compartments easier to find when you need them. However, name tags can be preferable to blank labels because they add a bit of personality to a practical function. They also have some specific side benefits:

  • Canister with two labelsRemovable, most of the time.
  • Easy to see, easy to read
  • At only two per sheet, these printable labels give you sharp-looking results without making additional wasted labels
  • Same size as Altoids tins (great for storing nails, screws, washers, and other miscellaneous hardware)
  • Absurd humor from personifying everything (“Hello, my name is Vanilla Extract” usually gets a chuckle)
 

Tags: , , , , ,

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

  1. carbar

    02/24/2011 at 4:11 pm

    What is priming sugar?

     
  2. Drew

    02/25/2011 at 6:30 pm

    Priming sugar is corn sugar (pure glucose). It’s a fine, white sugar that dissolves easily. When brewing, I mix in priming sugar just before bottling so the yeast has a little more sugar to consume. While digesting the sugar, the yeast produces more carbon dioxide that is trapped in the bottle, forcing the CO2 to dissolve into the liquid. That’s how we make carbonated cider the natural way.

    In short, priming sugar is used to make cider fizzy.